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Archive for December, 2008

NoThis article may be well intentioned, but when I see a site with Google ads on both sides of , in the middle of, and below articles, I always wonder if the intention is helpful information or making money from people clicking on the Google ads.

The blog is “Best-Family-Info.com Articles and Reviews!” The title of this particular entry is “Causes of Migraine Headaches.”

The first sentence  under their heading “Causes of Migraine Headaches” is,

Migraines are considered a disease of the mind but with very real biological effects and are probably hereditary passing from parent to child.

What? Migraines are a disease of the mind? Have they lost THEIR minds? Here we go again. Migraine is a disease of the brain, NOT a disease of the mind.

Overall, the article says very, very little. Probably a good thing. I doubt that someone who considers Migraine a disease of the mind would have much of value to say.

I do believe this article is more about wanting people to click the ads that surround the article than wanting to really inform people about Migraine disease.

Best,
Arabella

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There have been a multitude of news articles recently about research coming out of the Montefiore Headache Center about the overuse of medications causing mediation overuse headache (rebound) and leading to chronic Migraine.

While it’s good that this information is being widely promoted, some people need to do more research into the topic before putting their hands to the keyboard. One example of this is an article published on redOrbit.com on Tuesday, “Migraine Medication Can Become Addictive.”

This research has nothing to do with addiction, and the researchers aren’t saying that using Migraine medications can lead to addiction. When someone is addicted to medications, they’re no longer taking them for relief of pain; they’re taking them for the emotional boost they get from them. That is not at all what this research is about.

Migraineurs have enough problems with public perception and stigma without fools using words like addiction where they’re totally inappropriate. We don’t need the stigma of the word “addiction” following us around too.

So, to the staff at redOrbit: If you don’t know what you’re talking about, don’t write the articles or headlines. In addition to the potential damage you’re doing Migraineurs with this headline, you’re making yourselves look stupid.

Best,
Arabella ♥

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I’m slammed with a Migraine of my own today, but wanted to write a bit anyway. This time, a bit off-topic in a way.

When I started this blog, I hoped people would read it, and that it would save some people from spending time, money, and precious hope on false claims of Migraine cures, snake oil Migraine products, incorrect information about Migraine, etc. I thought it would take quite a  time for my blog to be found and read. In a way, it’s been gratifying that this blog has gained a significant readership in a short time. I say “in a way” because I really wish there were no need for a blog such as this one. But, as long as there is, I’ll keep speaking up.

To all of you who have read and commented, thank you. A special thank you to my fellow bloggers who have linked to this blog. I’m trying to link to you too. If I miss anyone, please leave me a comment or email me through the comtact box to the right.

Whatever you’re celebraing, wherever you are,

Happy Holidays!

Christmas Lights

Best,
Arabella ♥

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This blogger evidently thinks he/she is clever. In truth, he or she is a scammer. The name of the article is “Some Insiders Guide To Migraine Headaches.” The name of the blog is “Planet of Medical Innovations.” Here’s the first paragraph of the blog entry:

“It used to be that choosing toothpaste was a simple matter of going to your local market and picking between two or three popular brands. You may have had a choice of brands and varying flavors, but all in all, the toothpaste was made the same. It was to clean your teeth and to fight off tooth decay. However, these days, it is much different. One trip down the toothpaste isle will tell you that you have many choices in the toothpaste world. There are all sorts of brands, flavors, scents and colors. Some fight gum disease, some makes your teeth whiter and some claim to do it all.”

At first, I thought someone had just put the wrong title on their entry. Then I followed the “migraine pain relief” link at the bottom of the entry. Aha! Lo and behold, the link is an affiliate to an illegal online pharmacy. Why is the pharmacy illegal? Because they’re selling prescription medications without a prescription from your doctor.

They DO ask a few questions about your health on their order form. They may have a doctor who writes prescriptions based on those questions. Don’t be fooled. That is illegal. There are doctors in prison right now for writing prescriptions for such online pharmacy sites.

So, here’s another category of Migraine lies — totally bogus blog entries with the goal of luring you to an illegal online pharmacy. Beware!

Best,
Arabella

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I subscribe to a newsletter from a large Migraine site that has a lot of superb original articles written by one of their staffers. Really great stuff. Their newsletter has never been what I’d call great, but it’s been passable. My main gripe with it has been that several of the links have been to news articles related to Migraine. Now, that may seem fine, but these are the generic news articles that relate little beyond the kind of information that you typically find in the abstracts of the journal articles or even in press releases.

Over the last several weeks, the newsletters from that site have changed. They’re sometimes nothing but those news stories or maybe there will be one link to something that has more information, more depth. Oh, there’s always a quiz and a poll too. But what really gets me about the changes in this newsletter is that they’re no longer just Migraine information. For example, the most recent newsletter had four links to news articles. Two were on the Migraine site, but two led to other topic sites owned by the same company. The quiz was not a Migraine quiz, and the poll was not Migraine related.

Is it just me, or is this something that bothers other people too? When I subscribe to a newsletter about a specific topic, that topic is what I expect to be covered in that newsletter.

Tell me what you think about this, please:

Best,
Arabella

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blogcarnival125On the topic of Migraine Truth:

I’ve been focused on discussing inaccurate or disappointing information on the web, but there is a great deal of good, accurate, and worthwhile information out there too. This morning, browsing through Google Alerts, I came across a Headache and Migraine Disease Blog Carnival. This carnival is organized by Diana Lee, the writer of Somebody Heal Me, and this month’s edition marks the carnival’s one-year anniversary.

In case you’re not familiar with blog carnivals, Diana explains:

“Generally speaking, a blog carnival is a collection of links to a variety of a blogs on a central topic. The Headache & Migraine Disease Blog Carnival has been created to provide both headache patients and people who blog about headaches with unique opportunities to share ideas on topics of particular interest and importance to us.”

This month’s carnival topic is “Maximizing Your Enjoyment of the Holiday Season.”

Take a look at Happier Holidays: December 2008 Headache Blog Carnival!

Best,
Arabella

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Those of us who had been regulars of About.com’s Headaches and Migraines site have waited nearly two years since they last had a “guide” on the site. I was interested and pleased a few weeks ago to see that Mark Foley, D.O., had come onboard. We need all the good, accurate info we can get out there!

In his email newsletter today, Foley sent out a link to “Tylenol Use and Headache.” It’s decent, basic information. BUT for a headache and Migraine site, it’s missing something. Aceteminophen carries a big risk for rebound/medication overuse headache if taken more than a few days a week — even if you’re not taking it for a headache or Migraine. One would think that Foley would have made mention of this fact. Too many of us have found ourselves in rebound because our doctors neglected to warn us of this.

Disappointing. Really disappointing.

Best,
Arabella

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